Victory Gardens of The 1940s

While researching farm layouts, I stumbled across something that I never new existed.  Have you ever heard of a Victory Garden or a War Garden?  During WWI and WWII the United States encouraged Victory Gardens in their homes and at local parks to help increase food production.  20 million gardens produced 8 million tons of food in 1943.  Below are some of the pamphlets created during that time.  It feels like we are going back to these times again in the sense that there seems to be a revival of growing and storing your own food.  I hope these inspire you to keep on growing!!

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Resources:

Victory Gardens in World War II  by Sarah Sundin.com

Farming in the 1940’s by Living History Farm.org

Victory Gardens Then and Now by Family Food Garden.com

Victor Garden from Wikipedia.org

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5 thoughts on “Victory Gardens of The 1940s

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  1. We do need to return to simpler times.. With all of the concern for food safety we would be much better off. I’m sure this is why my grand-dad always had a plot growing. He never owned a house of his own but would find a vacent patch,dig it up and plant. Wonderful tomatoes that he would sell off of the front porch.
    My own garden days have taken aback seat but I am trying to get back to it…slowly

    Liked by 3 people

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